Friday, May 24, 2013

Magee Marsh: Non-Warbler Migrants

Magee Marsh attracts more than just warblers -- this post will document the varied assortment of kinglets, thrushes, sparrows, vireos, flycatchers, etc that pass through this fabled hotspot.

Northern Flicker
Always an attractive woodpecker to observe.






Common Nighthawk
The second goatsucker species seen at the venue.




Whip-poor-will
This cryptic goatsucker gave unparalleled views at Magee Marsh on the 16th. Indistinctly plumed and perched in the shade with streaks of sunlight, this legendary nocturnal nightjar was a challenging subject that defied attempts at satisfactory exposure.



Tanagers

Scarlet Tanager
A velvety flame of red and black -- this South American cardinal sets the trees ablaze.



Vireos

Philadelphia Vireo



Red-eyed Vireo




Blue-headed Vireo


Warbling Vireo

Yellow-throated Vireo

 Thrushes

Hermit Thrush
Veery
Swainson's Thrush


Grey-cheeked Thrush

 
Wood Thrush

 Sparrows

White-throated Sparrow
Lincoln's Sparrow

Eastern Towhee

Wrens

House Wren
Carolina Wren


Winter Wren

Creepers, Woodcock, and Everything Else

Black-billed Cuckoo



Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Brown Creeper
Blue-grey Gnatcatcher

 American Woodcock
Eastern Phoebe


Grey Catbird

Rose-breasted Grossbeak

Tree Swallow


Whip-Poor-Will

Baltimore Oriole


Pine Siskin


Brown-headed Cowbird
This icterid is justifiably despised for its despicable habit of brood-parasitizing other (generally more desirable) species' nests.


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