Wednesday, December 26, 2012

A Warbler not of the Prairie

Good news is that the Prairie Warbler can be found in Florida year round; bad news is, if you go looking for it in the prairie, you will never find it. The poorly named Prairie Warbler is an inhabitant of scrub, forest, and mangrove habitat in the Southeast and Southcentral US.


Prairie warbler seen at Corkscrew Swamp.


An attractive warbler, the Prairie Warbler is known to use two different songs suitable for different occasions: one to defend territory; the other for romantic purposes.


At Corkscrew, look for this warbler at the edge of the Swamp; not in the interior.


Seen in the morning just outside the entrance to Corkscrew Swamp, a flash of yellow distinguished this warbler from the more numerous yellow-rumped's.


The other warbler sighted at the Swamp is much less flamboyant:

A ground nester, the shape of the nest gives this warbler its name.
Seen in June on territory in Michigan, the Ovenbird is strongly territorial -- checkout an earlier blog post where it was observed in the vicinity of Hooded, Blue-winged, and Mourning warblers: breeding warblers of Port Huron SGA.

Leaving the Sanctuary, there were two additional observations worth a mention:


Three caracara -- 2 just outside the turnoff into Sanctuary Rd; the other across the mine sitting on a fence post.


Farther down Immokalee Rd, a group of wild Osceola Turkey were observed -- catching their plumage in sunlight highlights the iridescence of bronze, green and gold. Good to see these 'gamebirds' making a comeback.

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